AiA Day Trip Adventures

Inscription Rock & Zuni Pueblo

Saturday, September 28, 2019


Free Carpool/Rideshare for the First 10 Paid Registrations

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Tour Highlights
  • Visit Inscription Rock (El Morro National Monument) near Ramah, New Mexico with an orientation by Park Rangers.
  • Lunch at the Ancient Way Café (Provided as part of Tour) with the tour group.
  • Guided Tour of Halona: Idiwan’A (The Middle Village) at Zuni Pueblo by a Zuni Pueblo Tribe Member.
  • Free Carpool/Rideshare with your new AiA tour friends from Albuquerque to El Morro National Monument, The Ancient Way Café, Zuni Pueblo, and returning to Albuquerque.
Itinerary

7:30 AM – Carpools/Rideshares depart Domingo Baca Multi-Generational Center, 7521 Carmel Ave NE, Albuquerque, NM 87113.  Please arrive by 7:15 AM.  If you prefer you may also drive to El Morro on your own.

9:30 AM – 11:15 AM. Tour of Inscription Rock.

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM. Lunch at The Ancient Way Café

1:30 – 2:30 PM.  Guided tour of Zuni Pueblo.

2:45 PM.  Carpools/Rideshare depart Zuni.

5:30 PM.  Carpools/Rideshare arrive Domingo Baca MGC.


inscription of Logan, Post  and Long, Inscription Rock, El Morro

 

 

A Mysterious Ancient Observatory

This amazing ten-mile canyon was a major centre of ancestral Pueblo culture between 850 and 1250.  Located in the Northwest corner of New Mexico, Chaco Canyon was a focus for ceremonials, trade and political activity for the prehistoric Four Corners area.

Chaco Facts:

  • Contains the most sweeping collection of ancient ruins north of Mexico
  • Preserves one of the most important pre-Columbian cultural and historical areas in the United States
  • Chacoan building may have been aligned to capture the solar and lunar cycles, requiring generations of astronomical observations and centuries of skillfully coordinated construction
  • Sites are considered sacred ancestral homelands by the Hopi and Pueblo people

This park is on the Trails of the Ancients Byway, one of the designated New Mexico Scenic Byways.

Explore Chaco through guided tours, hiking and biking trails, campfire talks, and night sky programs with the National Park Service.  www.nps.gov

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See more on Chaco Culture National Historic Park with Wikipedia

Wikipedia contributors, ‘Chaco Culture National Historical Park’, Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 2 June 2016, 18:30 UTC, <https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Chaco_Culture_National_Historical_Park&oldid=723381288&gt; [accessed 2 June 2016]

A Park is Born

An Inside Look at the Creation of Petroglyph National Monument

Retired Albuquerque Open Space Superintendent Dr. Matt Schmader will speak on the topic “A Park is Born: An Inside Look at the Creation of Petroglyph National Monument” Wednesday, February 20, 2019.


Time: 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM

Location: Tanoan Country Club


The lecture is sponsored by Adventures in Anthropology, a 501 (c)(3) organization that focuses on the diverse people of the Southwest, their past history, as well as their present interactions, through the context of cultures, history and community.

Dr. Matt Schmader has worked for 39 years in southwestern archaeology, principally in the middle Rio Grande Valley.

He has worked on sites of virtually every cultural time period, ranging from PaleoIndian campsites to Archaic structures, from early ancestral puebloan pit houses to classic period petroglyph sites and pueblo villages, and from Spanish contact/colonial sites to the historic Red Light District in downtown Albuquerque.

His studies were instrumental in the creation of Petroglyph National Monument. His current research interests are the transition from foraging to horticulture, and the contact period in the American Southwest.

Dr. Schmader served as Assistant Superintendent and then Superintendent of the Albuquerque Open Space Division from 1995 until retiring in 2016 and was the only city Archaeologist form 2007 to 2016.

He is currently Adjunct Associate Professor of Archaeology at the Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico.


Tickets for the lecture are $50 ($26 for students) and must be purchased in advance by calling Adventures in Anthropology at (505) 821-3987 or using the link below. The fee includes lunch (entree of chicken, salmon, or vegetarian).

*Doors open at 11:30 a.m. Please reserve your tickets in advance.

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ACOMA’S “SKY CITY” TOUR

Adventures in Anthropology has organized a group tour of the unique Native American Pueblo, Acoma’s “Sky City” on Saturday, October 20, 2018.  The group will meet at the Acoma Sky City Cultural Center at 10:00 AM for a group tour, beginning promptly at 10:30 AM for a 1.5 hour guided tour.

Following the tour, the group will meet for lunch together at the Y’aak’a Café for a true taste of Acoma (lunch cost on your own).  The group is welcome to tour the Haak’u Museum, open 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM, at its leisure.  A special exhibit on coiled pottery will be on display. *Note: The registration fee includes a $26.00 tax deductible contribution to Adventures in Anthropology.

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Read more here

Ancient Culture in New Mexico

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New Mexico is a treasure chest packed full of pretty impressive jewels.

Did you know that in addition to some of the southwest region’s coolest trails, this state boasts incredible archaeological sites too? One site alone represents more than 10,000 years of documented human cultural history. New Mexico is also home of the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies (a division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs) and the Archaeological Society of NM.

It is a gift to live in a place where you have so many opportunities to explore and introduce your five senses to so much beautifully rich culture! From the pueblo ruins built by women at Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument, to the amazing engineering abilities evident in the ruins and a whopping 4,000 prehistoric and historic archaeological sites at Chaco Culture National Historic Park.

Browse our list of the archaeological sites to explore all over New Mexico and see my top 5 personal favorites:

Get maps and directions from your location here

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OnetoWander’s Top 5

NM Archaeological Wonders

Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument

My absolute favorite so far, not just because of the history and culture but because of the ENERGY. Walking around inside the remaining structure of Quarai you can feel something. I have been back to each of the 3 sites many times and am always amazed how each site has its own unique feel. An interesting fact in its pueblo history – the Quarai structure was built by its women inhabitants:)


Chaco Culture National Historic Park

Chaco is like a Disneyland for archaeology/anthropology lovers – there’s no way you can possibly see everything in one day! The 21 mile drive to the park seems long but very worth it, as the span of the site contains the most well-preserved and most complex prehistoric architectural structures located in North America. With 15 major complexes laid out in an intricate and interesting puzzle, you’ll run out of camera battery long before you run out of things to photograph here.


Bandelier National Monument

I haven’t roamed this site yet, but the photos easily make it a top 5 list item. Bandelier contains a collection of carved out dwellings, some that were once 3 stories high.


Petroglyph National Monument

Every time I walk the trail I seem to notice a different set of petroglyphs. Ancient symbols dating back to 400 to 700 years ago carved into a long wind of volcanic rock. As some sites are a long walk to access, this is not one of them. The ruggedness of the terrain combined with so many shapes to admire make this a great hike or short road trip for kids all ages.


Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument

The Mogollon Culture ❤ As an architecture nerd, I am completely intrigued by a nomadic people that chose to build their village tree-house style, but in a cliff. A very high cliff. The hike climbing almost 200 ft up is breathtaking; the unique history of its former inhabitants going back to 1275-1300 A.D. Made of flat stones set in adobe mud mortar, the cliffs protect 40 rooms of various sizes. The Gila Cliff Dwellings is the ONLY National Monument containing sites of the Mogollon people and once held an Apache grave site.

Road Trip Fever

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chaco 2

Chaco Canyon is to pueblo ruins lovers as Disneyland is to kids of all ages.  To see everything you really need more than one trip. Chaco is an impressively orchestrated maze of beautiful old stone, amazing history of ancient culture, and a little mystery….read more here

 

puye

Nestled in the solid rock is a place between earth and sky. This National Historic Landmark stretches over one mile long and features different levels of dwellings….read more here

 

tent rocks

This amazing geological marvel allows us to observe and experience geological processes up close. What a perfect day trip…read more here

 

wolf

Seeing these majestic animals is one thing – hearing them will make you 100% happy you bought the tickets that go towards a very great cause. (photo credit: Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary)…read more here

Archaeology and History

SAN MARCOS PUEBLO: ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY

Ann F. Ramenofsky and Kari L. Schleher

Tuesday February 20, 2018 7:30 PM
Albuquerque Museum of Art and History
2000 Mountain Road NW


San Marcos Pueblo, located at the western edge of the Galisteo Basin, is an aggregated town that has been known to the archaeological world since Nels Nelson’s preliminary field work there in the early twentieth century. Beginning before and continuing through the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, San Marcos was a vital community, a hub of Puebloan economic, political, and social activity.

San Marcoseños were known for their fine glaze-painted ceramics that were traded both within the Basin and beyond. The town was known to the Spanish: a mission and convento was established there in the 1630s, as was metal assaying and smelting. Their role in the Pueblo Revolt was not uniform, suggesting that factions may have been present within the community.

Ramenofsky and Schleher are the co-editors of a volume “The Archaeology and History of Pueblo San Marcos: Change and Stability”, recently published by UNM Press. In this lecture, they jointly discuss some of the results of that decade-long research at the Pueblo. Highlighted are evidence of stability and change in their settlement strategy, the glaze-painted ceramics that inform on the nature of potting communities, and protohistorique native population change.

Ann F. Ramenofsky is professor emerita of anthropology at the University of New Mexico. She has authored numerous articles and books, including “Vectors of Death: The Archaeology of European Contact” and the co-editor of “Exploring Cause and Explanation: Historical Ecology, Demography, and Movement in the American Southwest.”

Kari L. Schleher is the laboratory manager at the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center and an adjunct assistant professor of anthropology at the University of New Mexico. She is a specialist in Puebloan ceramics, especially the glaze-painted wares of the Rio Grande. She is a contributor to regional and national journals including Journal of Archaeological Science and Kiva.


The Albuquerque Archaeological Society is a group that advocates preserving archaeological and other cultural resources by informing members and the public about archaeological and ethnological subjects through our meetings, presentations, newsletter, other electronic media, field trips, volunteer efforts, field surveys, and studies.

Membership is only $25 for an individual or family, and it’s free to students with a Student ID or current class schedule. Membership puts you on our mailing list for our monthly newsletter, and gives you access to our field trips. However, our meetings are always free and open to the public, so come see what we’re all about!

Exploring the human experience