All posts by onetowander

Archaeology and History


Ann F. Ramenofsky and Kari L. Schleher

Tuesday February 20, 2018 7:30 PM
Albuquerque Museum of Art and History
2000 Mountain Road NW

San Marcos Pueblo, located at the western edge of the Galisteo Basin, is an aggregated town that has been known to the archaeological world since Nels Nelson’s preliminary field work there in the early twentieth century. Beginning before and continuing through the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, San Marcos was a vital community, a hub of Puebloan economic, political, and social activity.

San Marcoseños were known for their fine glaze-painted ceramics that were traded both within the Basin and beyond. The town was known to the Spanish: a mission and convento was established there in the 1630s, as was metal assaying and smelting. Their role in the Pueblo Revolt was not uniform, suggesting that factions may have been present within the community.

Ramenofsky and Schleher are the co-editors of a volume “The Archaeology and History of Pueblo San Marcos: Change and Stability”, recently published by UNM Press. In this lecture, they jointly discuss some of the results of that decade-long research at the Pueblo. Highlighted are evidence of stability and change in their settlement strategy, the glaze-painted ceramics that inform on the nature of potting communities, and protohistorique native population change.

Ann F. Ramenofsky is professor emerita of anthropology at the University of New Mexico. She has authored numerous articles and books, including “Vectors of Death: The Archaeology of European Contact” and the co-editor of “Exploring Cause and Explanation: Historical Ecology, Demography, and Movement in the American Southwest.”

Kari L. Schleher is the laboratory manager at the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center and an adjunct assistant professor of anthropology at the University of New Mexico. She is a specialist in Puebloan ceramics, especially the glaze-painted wares of the Rio Grande. She is a contributor to regional and national journals including Journal of Archaeological Science and Kiva.

The Albuquerque Archaeological Society is a group that advocates preserving archaeological and other cultural resources by informing members and the public about archaeological and ethnological subjects through our meetings, presentations, newsletter, other electronic media, field trips, volunteer efforts, field surveys, and studies.

Membership is only $25 for an individual or family, and it’s free to students with a Student ID or current class schedule. Membership puts you on our mailing list for our monthly newsletter, and gives you access to our field trips. However, our meetings are always free and open to the public, so come see what we’re all about!

2017 Flute Player Tour for Mesa Prieta

A Benefit for the Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project

k photo 1

This tour only offered once a year

Join a special guided tour of 25 “Kokopelli” petroglyphs – visit America’s largest-known group of flute-playing animal petroglyphs on the Wells Petroglyph Preserve north of Ohkay Owingeh.

– Sunday, October 22, 2017

– 9:30 am to 2:30 pm

– $175 per person

– Limited to 25 people

Listen to live flute music

featuring Patrick Mirabal from Taos Pueblo!


Listen on


Enjoy an incredible gourmet lunch catered by Red Mesa Cuisine, with wines by La Chiripada Winery, set high above the Rio Grande with cottonwoods in their autumn splendor! There will be a silent auction with fine art items.

Make reservations here 
or call 



Exploring Taos

New Adventure: Taos Exploration Trip

When: September 15 – 17, 2017

Sign Up

Little Christian Church in Taos Pueblo

‘Place of Red Willows’

The town of Taos is located in the north-central region of New Mexico nestled into the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Taos is the only living Native American community designated both a World Heritage Site by UNESCO and a National Historic Landmark. Residents have inhabited this beautiful community for over 1,000 years.

Learn more

New Find at Ghost Ranch

Ah the curious and exciting things in this world…

The American Museum of Natural History reports that a new species of dinosauromorph was among the mixed assemblage of dinosaurs and dinosauromorphs found at Hayden Quarry in Ghost Ranch, New Mexico!

What is a dinosauromorph (‘dinasauromorpha’)?

Dinasauromorpha is a clade of archosaurs that includes the clade Dinosauria (dinosaurs), and other closely related animals.  Birds are the only surviving dinosauromorphs.

See more about this amazing finding at American Museum of Natural History

AiA visit to the Ghost Ranch Retreat and Educational Center

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See more about our visit to the Ghost Ranch here

Puye Cliff Dwellings

The Puye Cliff Dwellings are the ruins of an abandoned pueblo, located in Santa Clara Canyon on Santa Clara Pueblo land near Española, New Mexico.  The site was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1966.

The dwellings were carved out soft of volcanic tuff on an approximately 200 foot (61 m) cliff ridge.  The rock itself is relatively soft and can be excavated using wooden tools.

Native peoples first settled in the area in the late 10th century living in dispersed farmstead dwellings at the east side of the Jemez Mountains.

Puye Facts:

  • Up to 1500 pueblo Indians lived in the area between 900 and 1580
  • Largest complex includes two levels of cliff-dwellings and cave dwellings
  • One level of the cliff dwellings is over one mile long
  • Edgar Hewitt excavated Puye Cliffs in 1907

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See more on Puye Cliff Dwellings with Wikipedia

Puye Cliff Dwellings. (2016, October 9). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 19:13, October 9, 2016, from